We are a group of human movement, rehabilitation and clinical researchers who provide new insights into the development of neuromotor control through childhood and adolescents, the changes in movement control that occur in response to pain, and the patterns of movement control that may predict the development of painful musculoskeletal conditions.

The lab head is Dr Kylie Tucker, who can be found on Twitter at @KylieJ_Tucker.

Kylie is a senior lecturer in the School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine @ UQ. She is passionate about working with great people who are excited to learn more about movement control and to share this knowledge. 

Take a look at some of the research being done in the Tucker group in the SBMS Research Theme video below:

The two main streams of research in the Tucker lab are as follows:

Motor Control and Pain Research #MCP_Research

With the combined skills of a strong international collaborative network, we aim to identify individual motor patterns that may predict musculoskeletal pain onset and/or support the persistence of musculoskeletal pain conditions.

Our primary testable hypothesis is that each individual has unique muscle coordination strategies, that will have specific mechanical effects on their musculoskeletal system. And that some strategies may make people more at risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders than others.

We currently have studies that consider the coordination patterns of muscles in the calf, and their effect on the Achilles tendon; and coordination patterns of muscles of the thigh and their effect on structures within the knee.

We aim to understand the factors that underlie individual movement control strategies, the consequences of these strategies on the musculoskeletal system, and if or when an intervention is required. This knowledge will ultimately lead to improved outcomes for people who have great potential to develop, or are already living with painful musculoskeletal conditions.

In addition to the studies highlighted on the Volunteer to participate page, we are often seeking volunteers to participate in our studies. To find out what additional projects are currently running and/or volunteer to participate in our research, please email Dr Kylie Tucker k.tucker1@uq.edu.au.

Child and Adolescent Neuromotor Control Research #CAN_Research

 

With the combined skills of a strong national collaborative network, the Children’s Motor Control Research Collaboration, our lab aims to provide valuable insight into the typical development of neuromotor control in childhood and adolescence; and identify targets for rehabilitation in children and adolescents with neuromotor impairments.

Within Tucker’s lab we use state-of-the art laboratory based technology to assess the validity of clinical outcome measures. We also test the potential for new technologies to be used in the assessment of neuromotor control, and we develop and test new rehabilitation interventions. This work is achieved while gathering valuable data on the neuromotor control of children aged between 6-18 years.

In addition to the studies highlighted on the Volunteer to participate page, we are often seeking volunteers to participate in our studies. To find out what additional projects are currently running and/or volunteer to participate in our research, please email Dr Kylie Tucker k.tucker1@uq.edu.au.